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Coronation Street star Julie Hesmondhalgh wins £20k for Maundy Relief charity on ITV's The Cube

In a gripping episode Julie, who is a patron of Maundy Relief, won the Pathfinder game selected by The Cube computer on her last lifeline.

Julie Hesmondhalgh (right) joined presenter Philip Schofield to take on The Cube

Actress Julie Hesmondhalgh scooped £20,000 for an Accrington charity while competing on a TV game show.

The Coronation Street star appeared on ITV 1’s The Cube hosted by Philip Schofield – and she walked away with the cash for Accrington charity Maundy Relief.

In a gripping episode Julie, who is a patron of Maundy Relief, won the Pathfinder game selected by The Cube computer on her last lifeline.

Maundy Relief founder Dorothy Mcgregor, 77, described Julie’s performance as tense viewing.

She said: "I’m speechless. Julie did so well and is so genuine and wants to help us and does. Without her we really couldn’t manage."

She added: "Her performance on the show was great. It was dramatic to watch. We can only say thank you.

"She has never lost a sense of who she is and has never forgot her roots here in Accrington. We are so grateful she nominated us and did what she did on TV."

Known for her Corrie character Hayley Cropper, 41-year-old Julie, who is from Accrington, has been a patron of the Abbey Street charity for many years.

She was able to help the cause further as the Cube hosted a special Coronation Street show offering the celebrity contestants the chance to win cash for their chosen charity

The rules of the game mean the contestants play seven skill and agility games, with only nine chances to succeed, in a bid to win up to £250,000.

The money increases with each game but if they fail the challenge they leave with nothing.

While competing on the Christmas Eve special celebrity show Julie lost four of her lives in the earlier games.

But after some encouragement from her husband, Ian, as well as friends and host Philip, she finally completed the Pathfinder game on her last life.

The money raised will go to Maundy’s core funding – which helps those living in poverty or on low incomes.

Maundy Relief operates by being both a ‘first port of call’ and a ‘last resort’ for many people in the local community.

Dorothy added: "All the money we raise is by people getting their hands dirty as we don’t get government funding. We are so happy about what Julie has done."

 

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